Moulders Lane

The Girl’s Own Paper – Jan 1916 (part three)

Jan GOP

Part Two

All scanned material copyright The Lutterworth Press.

The household section at the back of each issue of The Girl’s Own Paper and Woman’s Magazine, to me one of the most fascinating parts, begins in January 1916 with an article entitled Dishes for the January Parties – How to obtain good Effects from Simple Means by Kate Radnor. This describes recipes suitable for ‘a small friendly evening gathering or young people’s party supper’ that are ‘more effective than heavy joints of meat or stiff uncut poultry’. There’s some interesting social points intermingled with the recipes: supper is always served cold, which means no vegetables (?) but if Christmas pudding is served ‘(and it is quite correct to do so)’ – an amusing example of etiquette as social division rather than etiquette as courteous good manners – this must be hot. Cream is thinner in winter, cooking is done on fires and involves extremely long cooking times, and everything has to be left until the next day to set. Particular dishes, or even the whole supper, are often ordered in from a confectioners to save trouble. The point of the article is that these often don’t taste any better than home produced but are ‘superior in style and effect’, something which can easily be imitated.

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The Editor’s Page – The Girl’s Own Paper (January 1916)

This is a scan of The Editor’s Page in the Girl’s Own Paper and Women’s Magazine of the early twentieth century, and part of my project looking at women’s experiences of the First World War, during this centenary year, through the eyes of the Girl’s Own Paper and Women’s Magazine for 1916.

Flora Klickmann’s points, in this page from the January issue, are just as valid a hundred years later: that we, ourselves, are the British Nation, that it is not a separate abstract thing for which we have no responsibility; that increased general prosperity and leisure is proving our undoing and that we are forgetting higher ideals and duties; and that there is an increasing viewpoint that money forgives all sins; in many respects the article could easily have been written for our own times.

A rather fascinating sidelight is thrown on the perceived division of responsibility in the period: it is women who ‘make or mar the social fabric’ while men are responsible for the virtue of business and political systems.

A coda calling for knitters to provide much needed hospital wash cloths highlights the unprecedented nature of a war of this scale in the dependence on amateur assistance by the authorities.

A synopsis of the full issue with scans of some of the other articles can be found here. Read the rest of this entry »

Mobilising Women Workers – How the War is Demanding the Services of all and how Each One can Assist (Jan 1916)

As part of my project looking at women’s experiences of the First World War, during this centenary year, through the eyes of the Girl’s Own Paper and Women’s Magazine for 1916 – this is a scan of an interesting article in the January issue that describes the growing realisation of the role that women will have to play as the Great War progresses.

A synopsis of the full issue with scans of some of the other articles can be found here.

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Sketching in Hertfordshire (Jan 1916) – Maude Angell

This is a scan of an interesting article in the January issue of the Girl’s Own Paper and Women’s Magazine for 1916, describing a sketching holiday in Wheathampstead, then a rural district of Hertfordshire despite being just 25 miles from London.

A synopsis of the full issue with scans of some of the other articles can be found here

More illustrations of Wheathampstead houses can be found in the article on women war workers.

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The Girl’s Own Paper – Jan 1916 (part two)

Jan GOPPart One

The middle section of the January issue has just one short story with the rest articles on hobbies, topics of interest for the 1916 woman and an exhortation for female assistance with the War.

Sketching in Hertfordshire – The Little Bits by the Way written and illustrated by Maude Angell is an account of a sketching holiday, with tips on landscape work, by the G.O.P’s writer on all things Art. What’s particularly interesting is that the olde-worlde village of Wheathampstead she describes is only 25 miles from King’s Cross, which gives you some idea of how surprisingly little London spread in 1916. As I very much doubt the buildings she drew still exist, the full article may be of interest to local historians.

Mobilising Women Workers – How the War is Demanding the Services of all and how Each One can Assist is another fascinating article that pinpoints developments in the War and its effect on ordinary people. The Government is belatedly waking up to the fact that the male workers in commerce and industry, needed in the army, are going to have to be somehow replaced if the economy is to be kept going and that women could be useful here. (But don’t get any ideas, it’s just for the duration.)

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The Barrier to Intimacy by Alice Miller (1915)

This is a fun and surprisingly modern short story that I found when looking up the background for the serial in the January issue of the Girl’s Own Paper and Woman’s Magazine for 1916.  There’s a distinctly Wodehousian tone in the dilemma of the two characters – in the light of which the placement of the particular prayers at the footer seems a little misjudged.

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Securing a Pension – An Important Matter for the Wage-Earning Girl of To-Day (Jan 1916)

This is a scan of an interesting article from the Girl’s Own Paper and Women’s Magazine for January 1916, which throws a light on women’s financial position during the early twentieth century, particularly as a result of the Great (First World) War.  A synopsis of the whole issue with scans of other articles can be found here.

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The Girl’s Own Paper – January 1916

Jan GOP

The January issue of The Girl’s Own Paper and Woman’s Magazine for 1916 starts with the first of the short stories, The Woman’s Ultimate Expression by Norvell Harrison, an unintentionally amusing tale for the modern reader as I strongly suspect, from its message, that it was written by a man who deplored the developments in female emancipation:

Eleanor and Muriel Martin are orphaned sisters, who live in an old-world house in a sleepy Cornish village on a small private income. One day Eleanor returns from a visit to London, where she has been spurred into a sense of the uselessness of her life after attending a lecture by a ‘new man’. She announces that she is not going to marry her (fiance?) has let the house for a year and sweeps Muriel off back to London, to share a tiny flat in Battersea with her new acquaintance, Miss Jane Watts.

Muriel keeps house for them all, while Miss Watts and Eleanor study domestic science with a view to a future career but the firm, efficient Miss Watts does not like Muriel’s typically Cornish meals:

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The Women’s ‘Great War’ – The Girl’s Own Annual 1916

This is something I’ve had in mind since posting some extracts from the Girl’s Own Annual over the Christmas period. I initially thought it might be fun to look at what was of interest to women this time a hundred years ago but, with all the centenary commemorations of military events going on this year, it seems important to look at how the progress of the Great War affected the ordinary woman and her contribution towards it. Having just discovered, after nearly six years of ownership, that my little photocopier/printer is also a scanner, I should be able to add in the pictures – though working out how to embed these into the text may take some time.

The format of the Girl’s Own Annual is a bound collection of early twentieth century monthly magazines, The Girl’s Own Paper and Woman’s Magazine, running from October one year to August/September the next, presumably so it could be printed and in the shops in time for the Christmas gift market. Each magazine consists of several short stories; instalments of a serial story; practical advice on issues likely to affect women of the time and on pursuing hobbies, such as sketching or reading; articles that encourage an appreciation of the natural world; and an Editor’s Page, all interspersed with shorter pieces that give moral and/or religious encouragement or ‘thoughts for the day’. It’s copiously illustrated with line drawings and some photographs, and a large colour picture is often included, that can be removed and framed for those who can’t afford to buy ‘real’ pictures for their sittingrooms. Towards the back are articles giving advice, recipes and patterns for needlework, housekeeping, cookery and clothes.

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The 2016 Writing Challenge Revisited

By all the rules I’d set myself, and Goldberg’s advice, I should have posted what I’d been able to achieve at the end of the week and moved on. But it was shaping up into a nice little story and I thought I’d easily be able to get it to a state I felt happy to ‘sign off’ by the following week.

Of course I kept working on it after that, and am still working on it, which is exactly what you’re not supposed to do. My excuse is that I’m out of practice with the format and it’s taking me longer that it should do to produce the work but what it’s really about is my reluctance to post something that falls short of what I see it could be. (This is one of the things that scuppered my first degree – and I still appear to be doing it. Take note, anyone with similar inclinations.)

So, in an attempt to save face I am posting this little poem I wrote Read the rest of this entry »